Lindale Community Trust

St Paul's Church Lindale - The Future

LOOK WHAT YOU'VE HELPED US ACHIEVE! THANK YOU SO MUCH!

Amount raised: £14,860 - Thank You!148%

148% of original target reached! Crowdfunder campaign ended Oct 16th 2020

When 'Gift Aid' is added the total raised so far will be: £16,837.50

Thank you all for your support.

It's a brilliant start for our campaign.

Welcome - Thanks for Visiting Us

After the sad closure of Lindale Church in Cumbria due to mounting repair bills, a team of enthusiastic members of the local community formed the Lindale Community Trust.


Our aim is to create a multi-use community and heritage centre in the redundant church which will benefit local residents and visitors from further afield.


We are now registered as a charity and our formal constitution, including our aims and objectives, can be seen in the documents section.


We plan to create a versatile facility allowing for educational, social and recreational use of this much loved building. It would be suitable for musical and cultural events, plus leisure and sporting activities for young and old alike. Interest has already been received from several groups keen to use the church on a regular basis. The space will complement the village hall facility and would be available to rent, when the village hall is already busy.

About Lindale Church

There was a chapel in Lindale which was first documented in 1577. George Fox preached there in 1652. The present church of St Paul was built on the same site in 1829. It is a Grade 2 listed building, designed by the renowned Kendal architect, George Webster (1797-1864), who lived in the village and is buried in the churchyard. His mausoleum is also a listed monument.


The church is located within the boundary of the Lake District National Park, the English Lake District World Heritage Site. The church and village have a wealth of exciting cultural heritage, amongst them, John Wilkinson, the famous Iron Master and inventor, known as the Father of the Industrial Revolution. He is buried in his iron coffin beneath the church, making this a venue of international significance. Carlisle Diocese have offered the church to the community for a peppercorn rent

Our Plans for Change

The church closure presents an exciting opportunity to create a special place for the local community to enjoy. Our organisation plans to take a lease of the building and certain parts of the churchyard (sufficient for car parking) for the proposed future use as a community and learning centre. It offers a beautiful space with potential to host educational, social, sporting, well-being and leisure activities. The Trust wishes to welcome all members of our community, including younger people, the elderly, and also less advantaged or vulnerable people.

In addition, we have scope to welcome the wider public, including visitors to the Lake District World Heritage Site so they can learn more about our wonderful heritage.


We will create a flexible space, well fitted with a modern feel whilst maintaining the character of the original church where possible. We will incorporate good quality catering facilities and create a practical but cosy place, to widen the appeal of the converted building.

Our Vision for the Future

Lindale Community Trust have a strong vision for the Church to become a vibrant community facility used by local residents, youth groups and local businesses. We envisage a time when the local community can enjoy their visits to the Church again, for a variety of leisure, sporting and cultural activities. We also hope to see local residents and businesses make practical use of the space by hiring it for meetings, day conferences, and special occasions and to work in association with local caterers to ensure great events take place.


Our vision is also to welcome people visiting the National Park and surroundings, who will find here a venue where they can attend and enjoy cultural events. We will also tell the story of John Wilkinson, through modern interactive interpretation and displays.


And of course, through these activities we will be safeguarding the building and its heritage for future generations to enjoy, and for learning about the area to be handed down through these generations.

Our Heritage

The Industrial Revolution

Opportunities to learn and explore

Lindale's heritage is particularly associated with the early industrialist John “Iron-Mad” Wilkinson (1728-1808), probably Lindale’s most famous resident. He was one of the industrial revolution’s great entrepreneurs and inventors alongside such giants as Boulton, Watt and the Stephensons. He invented an improved boring machine without which steam engines would not have been successful. The Iron Bridge in Shropshire was his idea, as was the first iron boat. His iron monument in the village is a Listed Building, and his final home (Castle Head) is nearby just outside the village. Ironworks associated with the Wilkinson family are located 5 miles away in Backbarrow and these are now owned by the Backbarrow Ironworks Heritage Trust, a registered charity. Castle Head is now owned by the Field Studies Council, a registered charity. The iron coffin of John Wilkinson was famously buried at least 3 times and his final resting place is in Lindale Church.

Our aim is to advance learning and knowledge of the industrial heritage and social history of Lindale and the wider Cartmel Peninsula and promote understanding and knowledge of buildings of historic merit in Lindale. The preservation of St Paul’s Lindale will help us to achieve this, but we may use other venues to develop and trial these learning opportunities during the project whilst redevelopment takes place.

What's Happening Now?

The Lindale Community Trust has been established and is now a registered charity [Number 1191666]. The team of trustees meet regularly and hosted initial fundraising activity before Covid 19 halted further planned events. We have had success with two small grant applications. We have chosen a local architect, Mike Darwell of John Coward Associates of Cartmel to progress our plans and the focus now is on fundraising for Phase 1 and 2 of the project:


• Understanding the condition of the building and the scope of necessary repairs

• Creating the detailed design concept.


We are also liaising with the Carlisle Diocese regarding the details of the lease and responsibility for repairs. If the project does not succeed, then Carlisle Diocese will attempt to sell the church. A large initial meeting of the local residents established that Lindale does not want to see this happen.


UPDATE: We launched our crowd funding for this first phase of the work in September 2020. By 16th October (the end of the Crowdfunder appeal) we had raised [with Gift Aid] £16,837.50 - this is a brilliant start for our project.


There will be further crowd funding opportunities as the project develops, and we are working with expert fundraisers to establish grant opportunities based on the heritage and community benefits of the project.


If you donated to the first phase we like to say a very big THANK YOU!

Getting Involved

How you can help

We welcome everyone to get involved. Some already have by joining as trustees or offering assistance at initial meetings. We have a social committee too for our fundraising events and folks with practical skills to help out.


If you have skills and experience which you think are relevant, or are just passionate to get involved, please chat with us.


Specifically if you can help distribute leaflets about our crowd funding in September that would be a great help, especially in villages just outside Lindale.


If you have bright ideas about our project, do send us your thoughts.

Events for Fundraising

As Pandemic restrictions relax we look forward to having fundraising events for the project, and informative gatherings to explain more. Subscribe here to receive our updates and newsletters.

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Our initial Crowdfunder appeal is now closed

Download or View Documents

Contact Us

Registered Charity 1191666

Thank you Matthew Emmott for permission to use your photographs

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